Vitamin D and falls – the dosage conundrum.

Falls are a major health problem in elderly individuals. Although intensive physical therapy and management of hazards in the home can reduce falls by 25%, long-term practicality limits their use. Interest in vitamin D as a medical therapy has led to many trials; however, results using daily oral doses of vitamin D have been inconsistent. In the past 5 years, studies on the effect of bolus doses of vitamin D have produced surprising results. Bolus doses of vitamin D, given annually (at a dose of 300,000 IU or 500,000 IU) or monthly (at a dose of 24,000 IU or 60,000 IU) – equivalent to approximate daily doses of 800 IU, 1400 IU and 2,000 IU – result in a significant increase in the number of falls and fractures associated with serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D greater than 40-45 ng/ml (equivalent to 100-112 nmol/l).

These unexpected results show increased falls and fractures are adverse events related to vitamin D administration. Until further safety data is available, bolus dosing or daily doses should not exceed 3,000 IU and serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D should not exceed 40-45 ng/ml (equivalent to 100-112 nmol/l) in elderly individuals.

Global Health Course

Global Health is fast becomingĀ a priority of all health organisations. Get ahead of the curve, take part in this course and help improve health around the world.

Speak your mind

Your email will not be published.