Exercise-based pre-habilitation is feasible and effective in radical cystectomy pathways-secondary results from a randomized controlled trial.

Physical exercises offer a variety of health benefits to cancer survivors during and post-treatment. However, exercise-based pre-habilitation is not well reported in major uro-oncology surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility, the adherence, and the efficacy of a short-term physical pre-habilitation program to patients with invasive bladder cancer awaiting radical cystectomy (RC). A parent prospective randomized controlled clinical trial investigated efficacy of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program on length of stay following RC. A total of 107 patients were included in the intension-to-treat population revealing 50 patients in the intervention group and 57 patients in the standard group. Pre-operatively, the intervention group was instructed to a standardized exercise program consisting of both muscle strength exercises and endurance training. The number of training sessions and exercise repetitions was patient-reported. Feasibility was expressed as adherence to the program and efficacy as the differences in muscle power within and between treatment groups at time for surgery. A total of 66 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) 51; 78) adhered more than 75 % of the recommended progressive standardized exercise program. In the intervention group, a significant improvement in muscle power of 18 % (p < 0.002) was found at time for surgery. Moreover, muscle power was significantly improved compared to that in the standard group with 0.3 W/kg (95 % CI 0.08; 0.5 %) (p < 0.006). Adherence was not associated with pre-operative BMI, nutritional risk, comorbidity, pain, gender, or age.

In patients awaiting RC, a short-term exercise-based pre-habilitation intervention is feasible and effective and should be considered in future survivorship strategies.

Neck Pain

Out of all 291 conditions studied in the Global Burden of Disease 2010 Study, neck pain ranked 4th highest in terms of disability and 21st in terms of overall burden.

Speak your mind

Your email will not be published.