Clinical physical therapists research activity reality and barriers to their utilizing research findings.

This research study was performed to investigate the barriers to using the research findings of physical therapists on evidence-based practice. The subjects of this research were physical therapists employed by hospitals that agreed to cooperate with the research in B city.  A questionnaire made up of 6 research items, 8 physical therapist items, 6 presentation items, and 8 setting items, for a total of 28 items, was distributed. The responses were scored so the higher result scores indicate a higher barrier level to using research findings. Differences in barrier levels related to the likelihood of therapists using research findings in their practice varied according to the general characteristics of the result as according to the t-test and ANOVA. Scheffe’s test was used as a post hoc test. The analysis of 158 returned questionnaires revealed that there were significant relationships between the age, educational level, and professional satisfaction of the therapists and the barriers to using research finding. Significant relationships were also found between the items of “Research participation in clinical research”, “Frequency of reading research articles”, and “Support of manager to use research” and the barrier level. No relationship was demonstrated between the recognition level of evidence-based practice and the performance level with the barrier score to using research findings.

This study demonstrated that to improve the utilization of research findings, there is a need to provide therapists with continual education and opportunities to participate in research, and environments and ways in which the research results can be given practical applications.

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Scott BuxtonResearch article posted by: Scott Buxton

Scott is editor of Physiospot so expect to see his work popping up frequently. Away from the keyboard he is a physiotherapist specialising in geriatrics.

Comments

  1. I love this and it’s so true. As a clinician therapist, I know that a lot of my colleagues struggle because of access and feasibility of applying the new research when they do get a chance to access it.
    The part about job satisfaction is interesting too – if you don’t really like your job you’re not going to want to take the time to read more about it when you’re off.

    Makes sense,
    Christina

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