3D printed bone made using bone ‘powder’ and plastic

Using pulverized bone and a biodegradable plastic, researchers at Johns Hopkins University have 3D printed bone replacements in mice. 

This is yet another example of the potential of regenerative medicine to replace body parts using a mix of cells and plastics. In many ways it is similar to another technique that uses living tissue to 3D print body parts, which we talked about in an earlier post. Both techniques use a mixture of cells and plastics to encourage tissue growth once the bone or tissue has been implanted.

3D printing appears to be the method of choice for researchers looking to creating replacement bones and other tissues as well as developing prosthetics. How soon will it be before we see a 3D printed human heart or femur? Let us know in the comments section below!

 

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