Low Back Pain: Clinimetric Properties of the Trendelenburg Test, Active Straight Leg Raise Test, and Breathing Pattern During Active Straight Leg Raising

Nathalie A. Roussel, Jo Nijs, Steven Truijen, Line Smeuninx and Gaetane Stassijns

The purpose of this study is to examine the reliability, internal consistency, and clinical importance of 3 clinical tests that analyze motor control mechanisms of the lumbopelvic region in patients with nonspecific LBP.  Thirty-six patients with chronic nonspecific LBP were examined by 2 assessors who were blinded to the results of each other. The following tests were performed: the Trendelenburg test, the active straight leg raise (ASLR) test, and the ASLR with visual inspection of the breathing pattern. The results provide evidence favoring the test-retest reliability of the Trendelenburg and ASLR tests in patients with LBP. The internal consistency of the outcome of these tests was high for both assessors, suggesting that these tests assess the same dimension. The interobserver reliability of the assessment of the breathing pattern was fair to moderate. Further research regarding the interobserver reliability, clinical importance, validity, and responsiveness of the Trendelenburg test, ASLR test, and breathing pattern during these tests is required.

Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 2007, 30, 4 , 270-278.

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Neck Pain

Out of all 291 conditions studied in the Global Burden of Disease 2010 Study, neck pain ranked 4th highest in terms of disability and 21st in terms of overall burden.
News article posted by: Rachael Lowe

Rachael Lowe is Co-Founder and Executive Director of Physiopedia. A physiotherapist and technology specialist Rachael has been working with Physiopedia since 2008 to create a resource that provides universal access to physiotherapy knowledge as well as a platform for connecting and educating the global physiotherapy profession.

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