Naprapathic Manual Therapy or Evidence-based Care for Back and Neck Pain: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

Skillgate, Eva;  Vingard, Eva MD;  Alfredsson, Lars.

The purpose of this study was to compare naprapathic manual therapy with evidence-based care for back or neck pain regarding pain, disability, and perceived recovery. Naprapathy that is common in the Nordic countries and in some states in the United States is characterized by manual manipulations with a focus on soft and connective tissues, aiming to decrease pain and disability in the musculoskeletal system.  Four hundred and nine patients with pain and disability in the back or neck lasting for at least 2 weeks, recruited at 2 large public companies in Sweden in 2005, were included in this randomized controlled trial. The 2 interventions were naprapathy, including spinal manipulation/mobilization, massage, and stretching (Index Group) and support and advice to stay active and how to cope with pain, according to the best scientific evidence available, provided by a physician (Control Group). At 7-week and 12-week follow-ups, statistically significant differences between the groups were found in all outcomes favoring the Index Group.  This trial suggests that combined manual therapy, like naprapathy, might be an alternative to consider for back and neck pain patients.

Clinical Journal of Pain, 2007, 23, 5, 431-439.

View Abstract

Link to Full Text

Neck Pain

Out of all 291 conditions studied in the Global Burden of Disease 2010 Study, neck pain ranked 4th highest in terms of disability and 21st in terms of overall burden.

Speak your mind

Your email will not be published.