The initial effects of knee joint mobilization on osteoarthritic hyperalgesia

Penny Moss, Kathleen Sluka and Anthony Wright

Physiotherapists often employ lower limb joint mobilization to reduce pain and increase function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the initial effects of accessory knee joint mobilization on measures of pain and function in individuals with knee osteoarthritis. Thirty-eight subjects with mild to moderate knee pain participated. The effects of a 9-min, non-noxious, AP mobilization of the tibio-femoral joint were compared with manual contact and no-contact interventions. Results demonstrated a significantly greater increase in pressure pain threshold (PPT) following knee joint mobilization than after manual contact or no-contactinterventions.  The authors concludet hat this study therefore provides new experimental evidence that accessory mobilization of an osteoarthritic knee joint immediately produces both local and widespread hypoalgesic effects. It may therefore be an effective means of reducing pain in this population.

Manual Therapy, Volume 12, Issue 2, May 2007, Pages 109-118

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Neck Pain

Out of all 291 conditions studied in the Global Burden of Disease 2010 Study, neck pain ranked 4th highest in terms of disability and 21st in terms of overall burden.
News article posted by: Rachael Lowe

Rachael Lowe is Co-Founder and Executive Director of Physiopedia. A physiotherapist and technology specialist Rachael has been working with Physiopedia since 2008 to create a resource that provides universal access to physiotherapy knowledge as well as a platform for connecting and educating the global physiotherapy profession.

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