Developments in the synovial biology field 2006

Anette Knedla, Elena Neumann and Ulf Müller-Ladner

Synovial pathophysiology is a complex and synergistic interplay of different cell populations with tissue components, mediated by a variety of signaling mechanisms. All of these mechanisms drive the affected joint into inflammation and drive the subsequent destruction of cartilage and bone. Each cell type contributes significantly to the initiation and perpetuation of this deleterious concert, especially in rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts and macrophages, both cell types with pivotal roles in inflammation and destruction, but also T cells and B cells are crucial for complex network in the inflamed synovium. An even more complex cellular crosstalk between these key players maintains a process of chronic inflammation. As outlined in the present review, in the past year substantial progress has been made to elucidate further details of the rich pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis, which may also facilitate the identification of novel targets for future therapeutic strategies.

Arthritis Research & Therapy 2007, 9:209

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understanding pain course for physiotherapy and physical therapy

Understanding Pain Course

Help your clients break free from the confines of chronic pain. Enable them to begin to enjoy life again through improving your understanding of pain.

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