Body mass index associated with onset and progression of osteoarthritis of the knee but not of the hip: The Rotterdam Study

M Reijman, H A P Pols, A P Bergink, J M W Hazes, J N Belo, A M Lievense and S M A Bierma-Zeinstra

The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and the incidence and progression of radiological knee as well as of radiological hip osteoarthritis.  3585 people aged >=55 years were selected from the Rotterdam Study.  The results showed that a high BMI (>27 kg/m2) at baseline was associated with incident knee osteoarthritis, but not with incident hip osteoarthritis. A high BMI was also associated with progression of knee osteoarthritis. For the hip, a significant association between progression of osteoarthritis and BMI was not found.  The authors conclude that on the basis of these results, we conclude that BMI is associated with the incidence and progression of knee osteoarthritis. Furthermore, it seems that BMI is not associated with the incidence and progression of hip osteoarthritis.

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News article posted by: Rachael Lowe

Rachael Lowe is Co-Founder and Executive Director of Physiopedia. A physiotherapist and technology specialist Rachael has been working with Physiopedia since 2008 to create a resource that provides universal access to physiotherapy knowledge as well as a platform for connecting and educating the global physiotherapy profession.

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