Arthritis and Pain. Neurogenic origin of joint pain

Jason J McDougall

Arthritis pain affects millions of people worldwide yet we still have only a limited understanding of what makes our joints ache. This review examines the sensory innervation of diarthroidal joints and discusses the neurophysiological processes that lead to the generation of painful sensation. During inflammation, joint nerves become sensitized to mechanical stimuli through the actions of neuropeptides, eicosanoids, proteinase-activated receptors and ion channel ligands. The contribution of immunocytes to arthritis pain is also reviewed. Finally, the existence of an endogenous analgesic system in joints is considered and the reasons for its inability to control pain are postulated.

Arthritis Research & Therapy, 2006, 8:220

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Neck Pain

Out of all 291 conditions studied in the Global Burden of Disease 2010 Study, neck pain ranked 4th highest in terms of disability and 21st in terms of overall burden.
News article posted by: Rachael Lowe

Rachael Lowe is Co-Founder and Executive Director of Physiopedia. A physiotherapist and technology specialist Rachael has been working with Physiopedia since 2008 to create a resource that provides universal access to physiotherapy knowledge as well as a platform for connecting and educating the global physiotherapy profession.

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