Comparison of the analgesic efficacy of interferential therapy and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation

Christine Shanahan, Alex R. Ward and Val J. Robertson

The objective of this study was to compare the analgesic efficacy of interferential therapy (IFT) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) using an experimental cold pain model.  The results show that the mean cold pain threshold with a TENS intervention was higher than that with IFT. A training effect was evident as subjects’ responses become more consistent with repeated exposure to stimulation and the testing procedure. The differences in pain threshold between IFT and TENS for the two during-intervention (T3 and T4) measures were statistically significant (T3 difference in the means 5.9 seconds, 99% confidence interval 3.1 to 8.7 seconds; T4 difference in the means 6.6 seconds, 99% confidence interval 3.8 to 9.4 seconds). No significant differences were identified in pain intensity and unpleasantness ratings.The authors concluded that TENS is more effective than IFT at increasing cold pain thresholds in healthy subjects, and this effect increases with repeated exposures.

Physiotherapy, Volume 92, Issue 4, December 2006, Pages 247-253

View Abstract

Full article with Athens login

Neck Pain

Out of all 291 conditions studied in the Global Burden of Disease 2010 Study, neck pain ranked 4th highest in terms of disability and 21st in terms of overall burden.
News article posted by: Rachael Lowe

Rachael Lowe is Co-Founder and Executive Director of Physiopedia. A physiotherapist and technology specialist Rachael has been working with Physiopedia since 2008 to create a resource that provides universal access to physiotherapy knowledge as well as a platform for connecting and educating the global physiotherapy profession.

Speak Your Mind

*