Deep breath and off we go : start of IFOMPT 2016

It is now half way through the first day of IFOMPT. After 4 years of planning, Chris Mercer took to the stage at 9AM to welcome delegates to Glasgow alongside Annalie Basson, Dr Chris McCarthy, Dr Emma Stokes and Mohammed Razaq.

This was quickly followed by the brilliant double act of Professor Ann Moore and Emeritus Professor Gwendolen Jull setting the scene by reflecting on the rich history of manual/manipulative therapy and pondering on the direction that the next 15 years will take us.

Lorimer Moseley was the next inspiring keynote. His entertaining and informative style of presenting took the delegates through a journey where we examined how we expand our understanding of pain biology into patient care. We were challenged to examine that the response we achieve from our treatments may not be due to their direct physiological effects but to the intricacies of therapies, patient interaction and the belief in the treatment from both sides. In my role as an advanced practitioner I have been aware that the way I dress and the clinic environment that I work in influences my patients thoughts and beliefs about the information I give. Lorimer’s lecture made me reflect on my own treatment beliefs and the covert influence that they may have on the treatment effects I get.

My take home message from this keynote is that treatment is a package and not a single intervention. We need to understand the package to maximise treatment effect.

Prior to lunch Professor Tim Watson expanded delegates understanding of the inflammatory process and its role in tissue healing. This complex subject was well presented by Professor Watson prompting delegates to re-examine their thoughts on use of electrophysical agents in physiotherapy.

I look forward after lunch to the the rest of the weeks programme and to the rest of the SoMe IFOMPT teams reflection on the conference so far.

Neck Pain

Out of all 291 conditions studied in the Global Burden of Disease 2010 Study, neck pain ranked 4th highest in terms of disability and 21st in terms of overall burden.

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