Treatment of the sacroiliac joint in patients with leg pain

The authors conducted this study in order to assess which treatment is successful for SIJ-related back and leg pain as the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) may be a cause of sciatica. The study used a single-blinded randomised trial to assess the short-term therapeutic efficacy of physiotherapy, manual therapy, and intra-articular injection with local corticosteroids in the SIJ in 51 patients with SIJ-related leg pain. The effect of the treatment was evaluated after 6 and 12 weeks. Of the 51 patients, 25 (56 %) were successfully treated. Physiotherapy was successful in 3 out of 15 patients (20 %), manual therapy in 13 of the 18 (72 %), and intra-articular injection in 9 of 18 (50 %) patients (p = 0.01). Manual therapy had a considerably higher success rate than physiotherapy (p = 0.003).

The authors’ concluded that in their small single-blinded prospective study, manual therapy appeared to be the choice of treatment for patients with SIJ-related leg pain. They also said that a another therapeutic option to be considered is an intra-articular injection.

Sensorimotor Impairment in Neck Pain

Join Chris Worsfold in this short online course to learn about the evaluation and rehabilitation of sensorimotor impairment in patients with neck pain.