The effects of an exercise with a stick on the lumbar spine and hip movement patterns during forward bending in patients with lumbar flexion syndrome

Forward bending is often performed in daily activities. However, excessive lumbar flexion during forward bending has been reported as a risk factor for low back pain. Therefore, this study examined the effects of an exercise strategy using a stick on the angular displacement and movement onset of lumbar and hip flexion during forward-bending exercises in patients with lumbar flexion syndrome. Eighteen people with lumbar flexion syndrome were voluntarily recruited in this study. Subjects performed forward-bending exercises with and without a straight stick in standing. The angular displacement and movement onset of lumbar and hip flexion while performing forward-bending exercises were measured by using a three dimensional motion analysis system. The significances of differences between the two conditions (with stick vs. without stick) was assessed using a one-way repeated analysis of variance. When using a stick during a forward-bending exercise, the peak angular displacement of lumbar flexion was reduced significantly, and those of right and left-hip flexion increased significantly in comparison to those without a stick. The movement onset of lumbar flexion occurred significantly later, and the onset of right-hip flexion occurred significantly earlier with than without a stick.

Based on these findings, a stick exercise was an effective method to prevent excessive lumbar flexion and more helpful in developing hip flexion during a forward-bending exercise. These findings will be beneficial to clinicians in the instruction of self-exercise during forward bending in patients with lumbar flexion syndrome.

Gluteal tendinopathy

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