Retrospective analysis of physical therapy utilization by the specificity of the diagnosis and order written on the referral

Arguments against reimbursement for direct access to physical therapy (PT) are that a physician examination is necessary to diagnose and that there is a potential for increased cost.

The purpose of this study is to determine what percentage of PT referrals had a specific diagnosis and treatment orders. Additionally, specific and non-specific diagnoses and treatment orders were compared in regards to PT units billed, average visits per referral, and average cost per referral.

The charts of 1,000 patients treated in outpatient PT underwent a retrospective chart review. Interferential statistics were used to determine if there was a statistically significant difference between specific and non-specific diagnoses and treatment orders in regard to PT units billed, average visits per referral, and average cost per referral.

Twenty-nine percent of all referring diagnoses were non-specific in nature and 58% contained treatment orders that were non-specific. There was a statistically significant difference in PT utilization between charts with a specific diagnosis and a non-specific diagnosis (p ≤ 0.001). Patients with a specific treatment order also displayed a statistically significant larger average in billed units, average visits per referral, and average reimbursement per referral than those without a specific treatment order (p ≤ 0.0001).

The findings suggest that a physician diagnosis and referral may not be required to direct care for patients seeking PT services. Third-party payers that require a physician referral for PT services may be delaying access to healthcare and increasing costs.

Shoulder Assessment

Review shoulder examination with this online course that covers orthopaedic special tests, the types and implications of shoulder pain and relevant outcome measures and diagnostic imaging.