McConnell taping shifts the patella inferiorly in patients with patellofemoral pain: a dynamic magnetic resonance imaging study.

The purpose of this study was to quantify the changes in the 6-degrees-of-freedom patellofemoral kinematics due to taping in patients with PFPS. Fourteen volunteers (19 knees) who were diagnosed with patellofemoral pain that was present for a year or longer were included. Each knee had to meet at least 1 of the following inclusion criteria: Q-angle of > or =15 degrees, a positive apprehension test, patellar lateral hypermobility (> or =10 mm), or a positive “J sign.” Each knee underwent 2 randomly ordered testing conditions (untaped and taped). A full fast-phase contrast (PC) magnetic resonance image set was acquired for each condition while the participants volitionally extended and flexed their knee. Three-dimensional displacements and rotations were calculated through integration of the fast-PC velocity data. Statistical comparisons between baseline patellofemoral kinematics and the change in kinematics due to taping were performed using a 2-tailed paired Student t test. Correlations between baseline patellofemoral kinematics and the change in kinematics due to taping also were quantified. Patellar taping resulted in a significant patellofemoral inferior shift. The strongest correlation existed between the change in lateral-medial displacement with taping and baseline (r=-.60).

The inferior shift in patellar displacement with taping partially explains the previously documented decrease in pain due to increases in contact area. The lack of alteration in 5 of the 6 kinematic variables with taping may have been due to the fact that post-taping kinematic alterations are sensitive to the baseline kinematic values.

Derasari A, Brindle TJ, Alter KE, Sheehan FT. McConnell taping shifts the patella inferiorly in patients with patellofemoral pain: a dynamic magnetic resonance imaging study. Phys Ther. 2010 Mar;90(3):411-9

Targeted hip and knee strengthening

A short online course by Lee Herrington covering the principles of muscle reloading and strengthening for lower limb following injury.