Determining the level of evidence for the effectiveness of spinal manipulation in upper limb pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis

The use of spinal manipulation (SM) for upper limb pain has been advocated based on the concept of regional interdependence. However, its evidence has not been established.  The objective of this study was to determine the level of evidence for the effectiveness of SM in patients with upper limb pain as part of the concept of regional interdependence.  MeSH and Key words representing two broad subject areas: SM and upper limb disorders were used to conduct an electronic search in sixteen electronic databases. Randomized controlled trials and/or controlled clinical trials investigating the effects of SM in patients with upper limb pain were included. Studies including pain in the neck or scapular region and those using spinal mobilization were excluded. The overall quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE system.  Out of 3307 studies, six trials met inclusion criteria for this review. Of these, three studies were included in meta-analysis. Meta-analysis results suggested there were no statistical differences between SM and other interventions in the effects on reducing upper limb pain. The overall quality of evidence was very low.

The authors conclude that the number of studies regarding the current topic is limited. There is very low quality evidence that SM is not better nor inferior than other interventions in the management of upper limb pain.

Cervical Arterial Dysfunction

Join Dr Roger Kerry to learn how to make safe clinical decisions taking into account the risks associated with Cervical Arterial Dysfunction (CAD) based on the latest evidence and framework.

Speak your mind

Your email will not be published.