Deep transverse friction massage for treating lateral elbow or lateral knee tendinitis

Deep transverse friction massage, one of a number physical therapy interventions suggested for the management of tendinitis pain, was first demonstrated in the 1930s by Dr James Cyriax, a renowned orthopedic surgeon in England. Its goal is to prevent abnormal fibrous adhesions and abnormal scarring. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2001. This review was conducted to assess the benefits and harms of deep transverse friction massage for treating lateral elbow or lateral knee tendinitis. Two RCTs (no new additional studies in this update) with 57 participants met the inclusion criteria. These studies exhibited high risk of performance and detection bias, and the risk of selection, attrition, and reporting bias was unclear.The first study included 40 participants with lateral elbow tendinitis and compared (1) deep transverse friction massage combined with therapeutic ultrasound and placebo ointment (n = 11) versus therapeutic ultrasound and placebo ointment only (n = 9) and (2) deep transverse friction massage combined with phonophoresis (n = 10) versus phonophoresis only (n = 10). No statistically significant differences were reported within five weeks for mean change in pain on a 0 to 100 visual analog scale (VAS) (MD -6.60, 95% CI -28.60 to 15.40; 7% absolute improvement), grip strength measured in kilograms of force (MD 0.10, 95% CI -0.16 to 0.36) and function on a 0 to 100 VAS (MD -1.80, 95% CI -0.18.64 to 15.04; 2% improvement), pain-free function index measured as the number of pain-free items (MD 1.10, 95% CI -1.00 to 3.20) and functional status (RR 3.3, 95% CI 0.4 to 24.3) for deep transverse friction massage, and therapeutic ultrasound and placebo ointment compared with therapeutic ultrasound and placebo ointment only. Likewise for deep transverse friction massage and phonophoresis compared with phonophoresis alone, no statistically significant differences were found for pain (MD -1.2, 95% CI -20.24 to 17.84; 1% improvement), grip strength (MD -0.20, 95% CI -0.46 to 0.06) and function (MD 3.70, 95% CI -14.13 to 21.53; 4% improvement). In addition, the GRADE (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach was used to evaluate the quality of evidence for the pain outcome, which received a score of “very low”. Pain relief of 30% or greater, quality of life, patient global assessment, adverse events, and withdrawals due to adverse events were not assessed or reported.The second study included 17 participants with iliotibial band friction syndrome (knee tendinitis) and compared deep transverse friction massage with physical therapy intervention versus physical therapy intervention alone, at two weeks. Deep transverse friction massage with physical therapy intervention showed no statistically significant differences in the three measures of pain relief on a 0 to 10 VAS when compared with physical therapy alone: daily pain (MD -0.40, 95% CI -0.80 to -0.00; absolute improvement 4%), pain while running (scale from 0 to 150) (MD -3.00, 95% CI -11.08 to 5.08), and percentage of maximum pain while running (MD -0.10, 95% CI -3.97 to 3.77). For the pain outcome, absolute improvement showed a 4% reduction in pain. However, the quality of the body of evidence received a grade of “very low.” Pain relief of 30% or greater, function, quality of life, patient global assessment of success, adverse events, and withdrawals due to adverse events were not assessed or reported.

There is insufficient evidence to determine the effects of deep transverse friction on pain, improvement in grip strength, and functional status for patients with lateral elbow tendinitis or knee tendinitis, as no evidence of clinically important benefits was observed. The confidence intervals of the estimate of effects overlapped the null value for deep transverse friction massage in combination with physical therapy compared with physical therapy alone in the treatment of lateral elbow tendinitis and knee tendinitis.

The Knee Course

Having a detailed understanding of the knee is essential to all clinical specialties, not just sports. Enhance your understanding by taking an online course on Physiopedia plus.

Speak your mind

Your email will not be published.