Current evidence does not support the use of Kinesio Taping in clinical practice

This study asked whether Kinesio Taping is more effective than a sham taping/placebo, no treatment or other interventions in people with musculoskeletal conditions. It also sought to establish whether the addition of Kinesio Taping to other interventions more effective than other interventions alone in people with musculoskeletal conditions. Twelve randomised trials involving 495 participants were included in the review. The effectiveness of the Kinesio Taping was tested in participants with: shoulder pain in two trials; knee pain in three trials; chronic low back pain in two trials; neck pain in three trials; plantar fasciitis in one trial; and multiple musculoskeletal conditions in one trial. The methodological quality of eligible trials was moderate, with a mean of 6.1 points on the 10-point PEDro Scale score. Overall, Kinesio Taping was not superior to sham taping/placebo and active comparison groups. In all comparisons where Kinesio Taping was better than an active or a sham control group, the effect sizes were small and probably not clinically significant or the trials were of low quality.

This review provides the most up to date evidence regarding the efficacy of Kinesio Taping for musculoskeletal conditions. The current evidence does not support the use of this intervention in these clinical populations.

Neck Pain

Out of all 291 conditions studied in the Global Burden of Disease 2010 Study, neck pain ranked 4th highest in terms of disability and 21st in terms of overall burden.

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