OpenPhysio journal – a shift away from traditional publication models

OpenPhysio journal - a shift away from traditional publication models

The OpenPhysio journal is live!  The team at Physiopedia have been working with Editor Michael Rowe to put together a peer reviewed journal with a focus on physiotherapy education.

The journal has some features that are pretty innovative in the academic publishing space and represents a fundamental shift away from traditional ways of thinking about how we share knowledge.

Here are some of the ways we think the journal is different to more traditional publication channels:

  • Immediate publication. Your article is available to the public almost immediately after submission.
  • Peer review is open and transparent. Authors work together with peer reviewers, and the reviews and author responses are published alongside the final article, together with DOIs that make them citable objects.
  • You retain your intellectual property at no cost. OpenPhysio does not require you to transfer copyright to the journal, and there are no page fees for published articles.
  • Articles are first class internet citizens. Your articles can be enhanced with images, audio, tagging, hyperlinks, and video.

The project is still in it’s early stages (there are no publications yet) and there’s a lot still to iron out, but in line with the projects broader thinking about publication, which is to share stuff early and then hash it out in the real world, it has been made public for all to see. You might like to explore the Editorial and Advisory Boards and have a look at the policies around open access and peer review.

We encourage submissions from physios who are interested in learning more about teaching and learning, whether you’re supervising students or less-experienced colleagues in the clinical and community contexts, or if you’re an academic responsible for teaching in undergraduate and postgraduate classrooms. If you’re interested in teaching and learning in a physiotherapy context, please think about using OpenPhysio as a channel to share your ideas.

If you’d like to know more about the journal, please contact the Editor or visit the website.

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Physiopedia news by: Rachael Lowe

Rachael Lowe is Co-Founder and Executive Director of Physiopedia. A physiotherapist and technology specialist Rachael has been working with Physiopedia since 2008 to create a resource that provides universal access to physiotherapy knowledge as well as a platform for connecting and educating the global physiotherapy profession.

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