Intensive care unit-acquired weakness in the burn population

Intensive care unit-acquired weakness in the burn population

Intensive care unit-acquired weakness is an evolving problem in the burn population. As patients are surviving injuries that previously would have been fatal, the focus of treatment is shifting from survival to long-term outcome.

The rehabilitation of burn patients can be challenging; however, a certain subgroup of patients have worse outcomes than others. These patients may suffer from intensive care unit-acquired weakness, and their treatment, physiotherapy and expectations need to be adjusted accordingly.

This study investigates the condition of intensive care unit-acquired weakness in our burn centre. This study was conducted as a retrospective analysis of all the admissions to our burn centre between 2008 and 2012 and identified 22 patients who suffered from intensive care unit-acquired weakness. These patients were significantly younger with significantly larger burns than those without intensive care unit-acquired weakness.

The known risk factors for intensive care unit-acquired weakness are commonplace in the burn population. The recovery of these patients is significantly affected by their weakness.

Monica TanakaResearch article posted by: Monica Tanaka

Monica is our Physiospot Editor. She is a trained journalist with a keen interest in the physiotherapy profession. As Physiospot Editor, Monica explores stories and physiotherapy news for us with fresh eyes. She is a science and health communicator with experience implementing strategic communications in the not-for-profit, academic, and public sectors. Thanks to physiotherapists, Monica has kept up her love of cross-country skiing and cycling over the years.

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