Wrist Injuries in Nonprofessional Tennis Players: Relationships With Different Grips


This study investigated the use of different grips (Eastern, Western, semi-Western) in determining the pattern of wrist injuries in nonprofessional tennis players.  A total of 320 players reported no injuries in their activity; 50 (13%) reported injuries to the wrist. Medical records of these players were reviewed, and 30 extensor carpi ulnaris lesions, 3 lesions of the extensor tendons, 5 injuries to the flexor carpi radialis, 6 de Quervain diseases, 5 triangular fibrocartilage lesions, and 1 intersection syndrome were found. Ulnar-sided injuries were more frequently associated with Western or semi-Western grips while radial-sided injuries were associated with Eastern grip.

In nonprofessional tennis players with wrist injuries, different grips of the racket are related to the anatomical site of the lesion: Eastern grip with radial-side injuries and Western or semi-Western with ulnar-side injuries. Knowledge of this relationship may influence training, prevention, diagnosis, and therapy of wrist problems in nonprofessional tennis players.

American Journal of Sports Medicine, 6 March 2009, online article ahead of print

Link to Abstract

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