Increased conditioned pain modulation in athletes.

Increased conditioned pain modulation in athletes.

The potential relationship between physical activity and endogenous pain modulatory capacity remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to compare the pain modulatory responses of athletes and non-athletes. Conditioned pain modulation (CPM) was assessed in 15 athletes and 15 non-athletes at rest. Participation was restricted to pain-free males between 18 and 40 years of age. To measure CPM capacity, a sequential CPM testing protocol was implemented, whereby a test stimulus (pressure pain threshold [PPT]) was presented before and immediately after a conditioning stimulus (4-min cold-pressor test). Pain intensity ratings were obtained at 15-s intervals throughout the cold-pressor task using a numerical rating scale. Athletes demonstrated higher baseline PPTs compared to non-athletes (P = .03). Athletes also gave lower mean (P < .001) and maximum (P < .001) pain intensity ratings in response to the conditioning stimulus. The conditioning stimulus had a stronger inhibitory effect on the test stimulus in athletes, showing enhanced CPM in athletes compared to non-athletes (P < .05). This finding of enhanced CPM in athletes helps clarify previous mixed findings. Potential implications for exercise performance and injury are discussed.

Stroke Course

Every physiotherapist will work with someone who has had a stroke during their career. Gain a deeper understanding based on the latest evidence and become a better clinician.
Scott BuxtonResearch article posted by: Scott Buxton

My name is Scott and I am currently the editor of physiospot.

Away from the keyboard I am extended scope physiotherapist working in ED and an acute frailty unit specialising in rapid assessment and discharge of acutely unwell frail older people.

Speak Your Mind

*